Dark-matter satellite ushers in new era of Chinese space science

Dark-matter satellite ushers in new era of Chinese space science Dark-matter satellite Scientists in China are preparing the country’s first dark-matter satellite to start taking data following its launch on 17 December 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), which is also dubbed “Wukong” (Monkey King) after the famous warrior from the 16th-century Chinese novel Journey to the ...

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Fixing the Sun’s magnetic sway on cosmic rays

Fixing the Sun’s magnetic sway on cosmic rays magnetic sway Utilizing as of late discharged information from the Voyager I satellite mission, analysts in the US have built up another and precise recipe that portrays the Sun’s impact on enormous beams. Inestimable beams – extremely high-energy charged particles that originate outside of the solar system and travel at nearly light-speed ...

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Faces of Physics: a HAWC eye on the sky

Faces of Physics: a HAWC eye on the sky Faces of Physics “A HAWC eye on the sky” takes you on an audiovisual tour of a striking new astrophysics facility in Mexico. The High-Elevation Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-beam observatory – which was initiated a year ago – is intended to get a look at the absolute most outrageous occasions in the universe. ...

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Chiral molecules spotted in interstellar cloud

Chiral molecules spotted in an interstellar cloud molecules spotted Researchers could be one bit nearer to seeing how life rose on Earth, now that chiral particles have been identified out of the blue outside of the close planetary system. Chiral molecules, which play crucial roles in the chemistry of life, exist in two different structures that are mirror images of ...

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KM3NeT neutrino sea-scope takes shape

KM3NeT neutrino sea-scope takes shape Neutrino Telescope A consortium of European physicists building a vast neutrino detector on the floor of the Mediterranean Sea has unveiled the science it will carry out. The Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope (KM3NeT) will use strings of radiation detectors arranged in a 3D network to measure the light emitted when neutrinos very occasionally interact with the surrounding ...

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Cosmic messengers and the rise of neutrino astronomy

Cosmic messengers and the rise of neutrino astronomy neutrino astronomy “There are still many things to be studied in neutrinos,” said 2015 Nobel laureate Takaaki Kajita at the first talk of the Neutrino 2016 conference that began in London today. I couldn’t help but notice that his statement rang very true, as the day’s talks touched on everything from high-energy neutrinos to dark-matter searches ...

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Symmetry-violating neutrinos may hold the key to antimatter

Symmetry-violating neutrinos may hold the key to antimatter By Tushna Commissariat violating neutrinos As you may have read, earlier this week I was at Neutrino 2016 – the 27th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics – in London. Although I was only at two days of the week-long conference, I still have neutrinos on my mind. A whole host of experiments presented various data ...

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Limiting factors for the elusive sterile neutrino

Limiting factors for the elusive sterile neutrino By Tushna Commissariat More data are definitely needed in the quest for the sought-after sterile neutrino. That much was clear as more than 10 different global neutrino detectors announced at the Neutrino 2016 conference in London that they have found no evidence for the slippery particle’s existence. The sterile neutrino is a hypothetical and much-debated fourth type ...

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Nearby supernovae could have affected life on Earth radiation 

radiation  Nearby supernovae could have affected life on Earth The surface of the Earth was bathed in life-damaging radiation from nearby supernovae on several different occasions over the past nine million years. That is the claim of an international team of astronomers, which has created a computer model that suggests that high-energy particles from the supernovae created ionizing radiation in ...

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Construction starts on huge Chinese cosmic-ray observatory

Construction starts on huge Chinese cosmic-ray observatory Construction has begun on one of the world’s largest and most sensitive cosmic-ray facilities. Located about 4410 m above sea level in the Haizi Mountain in Sichuan Province in southwest China, the 1.2 billion yuan ($180m) Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory(LHAASO) will attempt to understand the origins of high-energy cosmic rays. LHAASO is set to ...

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